Singapore Chow Mei Fun Recipe (Video)

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  1. Ellen Porter says:

    This recipe is a favorite including with our 3 year old and a great way to use up pretty much any vegetable! I highly recommend using actual bacon instead of turkey bacon. It makes the ‘sauce’ (in quotes because it’s a very small amount and the dish should be pretty dry) so delicious. I’ve found you can omit the oil and soy sauce at the end if you use double the bacon called for in the recipe. (just the right amount of Americanization for my family;) ) I also always throw in small pieces of chicken with the shrimp and bacon at the beginning, and scramble in a couple eggs before adding the vegetables.

    Reply
    • Caroline Phelps says:

      Wonderful Ellen! Thank you so much for your suggestions and for letting me know that your family enjoys it 🙂

      Reply
  2. William B Howlett says:

    Wow. Super easy to make and substitute the veggies I had on hand. I’m so excited to be able to make this at home! Saving so much $$

    Reply
  3. Marcy youker says:

    I love Chinese food, usually I order it but now I decided to cook it, delicious and so easy, love the noodles i used vermicelli noodles mande with peas, green mung bean starch and water, love it, see tru beans, like glass, very good recipe love it ,I added green frozen peas for extra color, love it thanks for sharing your recipe, take out versions uses to much oil,like your a lot better, will do it again

    Reply
    • Caroline Phelps says:

      Thank you so much Marcy! 🙂

      Reply
  4. Lori says:

    My hubby loved this recipe. He even took the rest to work for lunch the next day. This from a man who doesnt eat leftovers!
    I only used shrimp csuse I didnt have anything else. Gonna try it again tonite and add turkey bacon.
    Thank you. It’s great!

    I’d like to see lo mein recipe of you have one. I can’t find a good one anywhere.

    Reply
  5. Molly says:

    Thanks for posting this wonderful recipe! I made for my family tonight and it was a big hit.

    Reply
    • Caroline Phelps says:

      Thank you Molly 🙂

      Reply
  6. Paula Vibert says:

    Great recipe. It’s rare a home recipe compares to restaurant Singapore Noodles, but this one does. I made mine with country ham pieces and it was fantastic..

    Reply
    • Caroline Phelps says:

      Thank you Paula! 🙂

      Reply
  7. Jo says:

    Hey Caroline, thank you very much for the recipe. I love this dish and I’ll definitely give it a go. The only thing I would recommend though is the change of the brand of rice noodles. It shouldn’t break up easily like that shown in the pic. Good mai fun or mi fen (mandarin) should retain its long strands, if cooked quickly with sufficient oil and high heat. I usually use 3-4 tbsp of oil and the oil is barely there once I’m done. And for a touch of healthy fats, I use avocado oil which is neutral in flavor and healthier than most vegetable oil. I’ll let you know once I cook this. Thanks again! 🙂

    Reply
    • Caroline Phelps says:

      Thanks Jo! The noodles were actually good, it’s the photographer (me) who took too long shooting the images 😉 This unfortunately resulted in broken noodles because they had overcooked.

      Reply
  8. Calorie King says:

    I recommend adding a 1/3 cup of chicken stock at the end, off heat. This is way too dry as is.

    Reply
  9. Laura says:

    When I made this it was SO dry and chalky I had to add 1/2 bottle of store bought ginger dressing to make it work. I followed the recipe to a T and it did not taste like a take our version… any insight?

    Reply
    • Caroline Phelps says:

      Hi Laura, traditional Singapore chow mei fun is dry, it’s only made using spices and contains no dressing. I’m not sure what version you are used to, could it be an Americanized version? I know the food served in American Chinese restaurants (which I grew up on) is very different from the food made in Asia (where I spend 8 years) or served in Szechuan restaurants in NYC. Most dishes are usually a lot sweeter and oilier in the US.

      Reply
  10. Chris says:

    Curry powder as in INDIAN curry powder?

    Reply
  11. Preeja says:

    Hi..I have tried different recipes for Singapore noodles and it never comes out right…what kind of curry powder do you use?

    Reply
    • Caroline Phelps says:

      Hi Preeja, I use Simply Organic curry powder that you can get at your local grocery store. Or you can try making your own, I think it’s fairly easy but I’m too lazy to do it 🙂

      Reply
  12. Miranda says:

    I literally get that from take out at least once a week. I’m obsessed with greasy spicy Singapore noodles.

    Reply
    • Caroline Phelps says:

      You and Ben would get really well haha!

      Reply
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